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Undergraduate Sociology

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Undergraduate Sociology

2016 Fall Term

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3 Units

PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY (GS)

Sociology 240

This course introduces students to the ways in which sociologists use theory and research to study human group behavior and the processes by which people build, maintain, and change their institutional arrangements and relationships with one another. The course will focus on five areas of inquiry: social structure, interaction, and change; inequality and diversity; family and health; crime, criminal justice, and law; and global comparative.


3 Units

SOCIAL PROBLEMS (GS)

Sociology 250

This course examines various theoretical explanations of contemporary social problems such as crime, drug use, poverty, discrimination and environmental pollution. The impact of social problems on different groups in society and the role of social movements, government, and social policy are considered.


3 Units

INTRODUCTION TO FAMILY STUDIES (GS)

Sociology 252

This course emphasizes the influence of gender, race/ethnicity, and class on family and marriage in comtemporary U.S. society. It introduces students to theories and research that explain social forces affecting family commitments, and familiarizes them with varying social and cultural patterns of family formation.


3 Units

RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS (DV)(GS)

Sociology 265

This course examines relationships between racial minorities and the majority group in the United States in their socio-historical contexts. Early histories of relations between minorities and the majority as well as present relations will be addressed. Questions raised include whether American society should attempt to minimize differences between minorities and the majority, whether to blend or maintain group identities, and how we should address existing barriers and inequalities. Relationships and differences among minority groups will also be examined.


3 Units

THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY: A SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE (DV)(GS)

Sociology 270

This course provides lower level undergraduate students with systematic sociological understanding of the historical and current experiences of African American people.


3 Units

INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY (GS)

Sociology 276

An introduction to the field of criminology through examination of theories and patterns of criminal behavior, the operation of the criminal justice system, and the politics of crime control policy.


3 Units

ASIAN AMERICANS (DV) (GS)

Sociology 285

The course examines the intersection of Asia and United States through peoples who migrated from Asia. It reviews issues of race and ethnicity and provides an overview in Asian cultures so that students can understand Asian American diversity and Asian cultures of orgin. It examines the diverse experiences of the various Asian peoples who have migrated to the U.S.


3 Units

BASIC SOCIAL STATISTICS

Sociology 295

Introduction to basic statistical methods and their utility in sociology including statistical concepts, frequency distribution, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation analysis, OLS regression analysis, and including the logic of hypothesis testing. In addition, introduction to basic operations of PASW (formally SPSS) statistical software in social data analysis.


3 Units

CULTURE, MEDICINE AND HEALTH

Sociology 302

Medical anthropologists apply critical concepts and ethnographic methods to understand the lived experience of illness and suffering; differing medical practices; and the various ways modern healthcare impacts societies. This course is an introduction to the field and designed for students in the social sciences, humanities, and biological/health sciences.


3 Units

SOCIOLOGY OF DISABILITY

Sociology 315

Sociology of Disability is an examination of the social construction of disability, including its historical and cross-cultural variations, institutional and organizational contexts, and interactional and emotional dimensions. Particular attention is given to the experience of living with various biomedical conditions and the ways in which the social status of disability is related to other forms of social inequality and difference.


3 Units

ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY

Sociology 319

This course examines the economic and political structures that have induced natural environmental degradation throughout the world and highlights the impact of collective social actors mobilizing to influence the process of environmental policy formation in order to address environmental and technological risks.


3 Units

SOCIOLOGY OF NATURAL DISASTERS

Sociology 321

This course examines the impact of natural events from a sociological perspective, including hurricanes and earthquakes in which a relatively self-sufficient community undergoes severe physical destruction and incurs in financial loses and the loss of community. Agency and governmental response to disaster emergencies will also be considered.


3 Units

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR

Sociology 340

An examination of the causes and consequences of social movements and collective behavior, including such phenomena as riots; fads; panic; trade unions; reform, revolutionary, and liberation movements; utopian communities.


3 Units

SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER

Sociology 345

This course will analyze gender as a process and as a social institution. It will examine how we can experience gender in ways that maintain existing gender relations or in ways that challenge them.


3 Units

CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE SOCIETY

Sociology 350

This course examines contemporary Japanese society. It includes a study of social institutions, processes, and culture of Japan. the course examines following areas: (a) culture (beliefs, customs, social identity); (b) social institutions (family, religion, education, work, media); (c) societal processes (socialization, deviance, urbanization); (d) inequalities (gender, income, race-ethnic, region); and (e) the politics, economy, and international position of Japan.


3 Units

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Sociology 355

An examination of the process and results of human interaction with an emphasis on attitudes and attitude change, society and personality, inter-group relations and processes of socialization.


3 Units

POPULATION STUDIES

Sociology 362

A study of the development of world population and the social significance of different population sizes and growth rates; emphasis on the social determinants of fertility, mortality and migration.


3 Units

JUVENILE DELINQUENCY

Sociology 370

A study of the incidence of delinquency, theories and findings regarding causation, and the policies designed for treatment and prevention of delinquency.


3 Units

SOCIOLOGY OF VIOLENT CRIME

Sociology 371

This course will provide an in-depth look at homicide and other violent crimes as a social and legal category and at the social psychological variables that affect them. Various types of criminal violence will be examined in American society and in a global context. Forensic issues will be addressed along with political and social issues.


3 Units

SOCIOLOGY OF POLICE AND COURTS

Sociology 374

A sociological analysis of the development and behavior of the police, lawyers, prosecutors and judiciary in society and their role in social control.


3 Units

SOCIOLOGY OF PUNISHMENT AND CORRECTIONS

Sociology 378

The critical analysis of probation, parole, halfway houses, jails and prisons. Their origins in and possible function for the larger society will also be examined. Field trip is required.


3 Units

WOMEN AND CRIME

Sociology 379

This course examines the frequency and nature of female offending and female victimization; the frequently blurred boundaries of female victimization and criminalization; and the role of criminal law, police, and courts in the processing of female victims and offenders.


3 Units

ORGANIZATIONS AND SOCIETY

Sociology 380

An examination of the growth and role of organizations in society with specific attention to American society.


3 Units

RACIAL & ETHNIC INEQUALITY: BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

Sociology 393

Readings in theoretical, empirical, and policy literature will offer an in-depth study of racial and ethnic inequality in criminal justice, housing, poverty, health, education and immigration. The class features an experiential component through field trips across the region to thematically orientated site visits with experts in the field of inequality.


3 Units

MINORITY AND MULTIRACIAL FAMILIES (DV)

Sociology 394

This course will examine the "traditional" definition of family throughout American history as well as how more and more families challenge this definition. We will discuss how political, economic and social factors have shaped the experiences, structure and dynamics of families; and we will analyze trends in family formation patterns. (Offered jointly with Race and Ethnic Studies).


3 Units

CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORY

Sociology 472

This course is an in-depth investigation of criminological theories with an emphasis on sociological criminology. Students will compare-contrast the assumptions, principles and concepts of major theories, examine empirical research relevant to the theories, and consider the policy applications of theoretical perspectives.


3 Units

SOCIAL THEORY: CLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES

Sociology 473

An examination of classical and contemporary social thought. The connections between early major European and contemporary U.S. and international theorists will be emphasized to analyze key areas of sociological inquiry. The course will map important theoretical camps in sociology as well as conduct analysis of contemporary and historical issues using social theory. Unreq: SOCIOLGY 420, ANTHROPL 420


3 Units

METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH

Sociology 476

To acquaint the student with research methods in sociology and the social sciences; the foundation of sociology in science; the role of theory in research; construction of the research design; sampling, data gathering techniques, and analysis and interpretation of data.


1-12 Units

APPLIED SOCIOLOGY

Sociology 493

This course involves a supervised internship in a public or private organization. Through on campus seminars and written assignments on the intern experience, students learn how sociology can be applied to solve social problems. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits in degree. Prereq: Consent of internship coordinator.


3 Units

SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY

Sociology 494

Variable topics. Group activity. An advanced course of study in a defined subject matter area emphasizing a small group in intense study with a faculty member. Repeatable.


1-3 Units

SPECIAL STUDIES

Sociology 496

Variable topics. Group activity. Not offered regularly in the curriculum but offered on topics selected on the basis of timeliness, need, and interest, and generally in the format of regularly scheduled Catalog offerings. Repeatable.


1-3 Units

INDEPENDENT STUDY- UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH

Sociology 498R

Study of a selected topic or topics under the direction of a faculty member. Repeatable.

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