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Undergraduate Sociology

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Undergraduate Sociology

2015 Spring Term

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3 Units

PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY (GS)

Sociology 240

This course introduces students to the ways in which sociologists use theory and research to study human group behavior and the processes by which people build, maintain, and change their institutional arrangements and relationships with one another. The course will focus on five areas of inquiry: social structure, interaction, and change; inequality and diversity; family and health; crime, criminal justice, and law; and global comparative.


3 Units

SOCIAL PROBLEMS (GS)

Sociology 250

This course examines various theoretical explanations of contemporary social problems such as crime, drug use, poverty, discrimination and environmental pollution. The impact of social problems on different groups in society and the role of social movements, government, and social policy are considered.


3 Units

INTRODUCTION TO FAMILY STUDIES (GS)

Sociology 252

This course emphasizes the influence of gender, race/ethnicity, and class on family and marriage in comtemporary U.S. society. It introduces students to theories and research that explain social forces affecting family commitments, and familiarizes them with varying social and cultural patterns of family formation.


3 Units

RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS (DV)(GS)

Sociology 265

This course examines relationships between racial minorities and the majority group in the United States in their socio-historical contexts. Early histories of relations between minorities and the majority as well as present relations will be addressed. Questions raised include whether American society should attempt to minimize differences between minorities and the majority, whether to blend or maintain group identities, and how we should address existing barriers and inequalities. Relationships and differences among minority groups will also be examined.


3 Units

INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY (GS)

Sociology 276

An introduction to the field of criminology through examination of theories and patterns of criminal behavior, the operation of the criminal justice system, and the politics of crime control policy.


3 Units

ASIAN AMERICANS (DV)

Sociology 285

The course examines the intersection of Asia and United States through peoples who migrated from Asia. It reviews issues of race and ethnicity and provides an overview in Asian cultures so that students can understand Asian American diversity and Asian cultures of orgin. It examines the diverse experiences of the various Asian peoples who have migrated to the U.S., including inter-Asian American relations and intergroup relations between Asian Americans and others in the U.S. The course explores issues of Asian American discrimination, stereotypes, indentity formation, collective action and pan Asian identities, and hybrid or transnational identities.


3 Units

BASIC SOCIAL STATISTICS

Sociology 295

Introduction to basic statistical methods and their utility in sociology including statistical concepts, frequency distribution, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation analysis, OLS regression analysis, and including the logic of hypothesis testing. In addition, introduction to basic operations of PASW (formally SPSS) statistical software in social data analysis.


3 Units

SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH AND ILLNESS

Sociology 310

This course examines the sociocultural aspects of health and illness, the patient-practitioner relationship, the socialization of health practitioners, the social organization of health care services, and the role of ethics in medical decision-making. It analyzes the problems and inequities in our present system of health care delivery in the United States, with particular emphasis on the sexism, racism, and classism in policy and practice. It analyzes alternative models of health care delivery, and discusses modifications in policy and practice necessary to bring about change.


3 Units

SOCIOLOGY OF DISABILITY

Sociology 315

Sociology of Disability is an examination of the social construction of disability, including its historical and cross-cultural variations, institutional and organizational contexts, and interactional and emotional dimensions. Particular attention is given to the experience of living with various biomedical conditions and the ways in which the social status of disability is related to other forms of social inequality and difference.


3 Units

SOCIOLOGY OF NATURAL DISASTERS

Sociology 321

This course examines the impact of natural events from a sociological perspective, including hurricanes and earthquakes in which a relatively self-sufficient community undergoes severe physical destruction and incurs in financial loses and the loss of community. Agency and governmental response to disaster emergencies will also be considered.


3 Units

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR

Sociology 340

An examination of the causes and consequences of social movements and collective behavior, including such phenomena as riots; fads; panic; trade unions; reform, revolutionary, and liberation movements; utopian communities.


3 Units

SOCIAL STRATIFICATION AND SOCIAL INEQUALITY

Sociology 351

An analysis of the causes, consequences, and remedies of inequalities in power, income, wealth, authority, ethnic and social status.


3 Units

CONTEMPORARY CHINESE SOCIETY

Sociology 358

This course is an overview of post-Mao Chinese society. It focuses on the institutional, demographic, cultural, economic, and political transformation in China since 1978. Included are changes in rural and urban social life, mass migration, changing family and gender relations, social and economic inequalities, ethnic and regional diversity, and rising social tensions.


3 Units

POPULATION STUDIES

Sociology 362

A study of the development of world population and the social significance of different population sizes and growth rates; emphasis on the social determinants of fertility, mortality and migration.


3 Units

SOCIOLOGY OF TERRORISM

Sociology 373

This course will examine Terrorism as a weapon of power, a forensic issue, and a social phenomenon. Types of Terror, types of groups and governments involved in terrror, and the people who become terrorists will be examined. Theories of political policy, group dynamics, and individual predilections will be evaluated so that terrorism can be understood and combated.


3 Units

SOCIOLOGY OF POLICE AND COURTS

Sociology 374

A sociological analysis of the development and behavior of the police, lawyers, prosecutors and judiciary in society and their role in social control.


3 Units

RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

Sociology 375

This course offers an overview of Restorative Justice including a consideration of definitions, cultural roots, theoretical orgins, key principles, models and practices, global conflicts and peaceful resolutions, controversial issues, and future directions. The course also provides a critical assessment of the potential of Restorative Justice as well as its limitations.


3 Units

SOCIOLOGY OF DRUGS AND CRIME

Sociology 377

This course examines the intersection of drugs and crime in U.S. society. This course utilizes the social constructionist perspective as it pertains to both legal and illegal drugs. Through the use of the constructionist perspective, this class will explore how believed truths and realities about drugs are often socially created, how the laws and the control of drugs has been constructed and maintained, how culture and history influence perceptions of drugs and crime, and how societal norms, values and ideas concerning drugs are created and perpetuated.


3 Units

THE HOLOCAUST: NAZI GERMANY AND THE GENOCIDE OF THE JEWS

Sociology 388

This course will examine the origins, implementation, and legacies of the Nazi Holocaust against the Jews. It is intended to help students gain an appreciation of the importance of the Holocaust to the Jewish experience, while understanding that other groups also were victimized. (Offered jointly with religious studies).


3 Units

ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY

Sociology 420

This course is a broad survey of anthropological theory. The goal is to understand anthropology's specific historical trajectory as it relates to theory and to see how anthropological theory has been put into practice/informed ethnographic writing, both classic and contemporary monographs. Students will be expected to engage at a high level through critical reading and critical writing assignments. Unreq: SOCIOLGY 473, ANTHROPL 420


3 Units

CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORY

Sociology 472

This course is an in-depth investigation of criminological theories with an emphasis on sociological criminology. Students will compare-contrast the assumptions, principles and concepts of major theories, examine empirical research relevant to the theories, and consider the policy applications of theoretical perspectives.


3 Units

SOCIAL THEORY: CLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES

Sociology 473

An examination of classical and contemporary social thought. The connections between early major European and contemporary U.S. and international theorists will be emphasized to analyze key areas of sociological inquiry. The course will map important theoretical camps in sociology as well as conduct analysis of contemporary and historical issues using social theory. Unreq: SOCIOLGY 420, ANTHROPL 420


3 Units

METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH

Sociology 476

To acquaint the student with research methods in sociology and the social sciences; the foundation of sociology in science; the role of theory in research; construction of the research design; sampling, data gathering techniques, and analysis and interpretation of data.


2 Units

SUPERVISED TEACHING AIDE

Sociology 482

This course provides selected undergraduates with teaching experience in a college classroom. Students learn from a teaching aide experience in which the student assists an instructor in preparing, delivering, and overseeing lab, review or discussion sessions or by tutoring students. The student will attend the class sessions for a second time, meet weekly with the instructor, and is under the direct supervision of a faculty mentor.


1-3 Units

TRAVEL STUDY

Sociology 491

Variable topics. Faculty-led courses abroad. Repeatable.


1-12 Units

APPLIED SOCIOLOGY

Sociology 493

This course involves a supervised internship in a public or private organization. Through on campus seminars and written assignments on the intern experience, students learn how sociology can be applied to solve social problems. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits in degree. Prereq: Consent of internship coordinator.


1-3 Units

INDEPENDENT STUDY- UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH

Sociology 498R

Study of a selected topic or topics under the direction of a faculty member. Repeatable.

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